#Digital #Transformation is #About #People

Karl Smith will be talking at Digital Transformation 2017 on 23rd Feb Our Dynamic Earth Edinburgh organised by Scot TECH http://www.scot-tech.com/

Digital is about People, not technology. Digital is a response to the desire of people to focus their lives towards quick and easy tasks, simplify processes and utilise their time in micro experiences. The challenge for Digital Transformation is to not get trapped in limiting technology solutions but to really meet the desire of people to have less stress, highly engaging and focused experiences with shorter duration’s while maintaining quality and accountability.

  • Prioritise creating highly engaging, positive experiences

  • Focus on the simplification of process

  • Avoid getting trapped in limiting technology solutions

  • Ensure transformation strategy is evidence-led

  • Understand the relationship between culture, people & process

For more details register here http://www.digifutures.co.uk/register

Karl Smith has learned from clients in USA, Russia, China, Japan, Switzerland, UK, Germany, France, Australia, Brazil, Sweden etc how to transform them, not just, what to change.

BIO

Karl Smith Experience ConsultantKarl Smith is a highly creative and motivated person with keen insight ability. He is a critical thinker and is able to rapidly discover the essence of problems then define, communicate, create buy-in and deliver solutions. He positively motivates those around him and is able to engender a great team dynamic by leading from the front. He has business experience spanning 28 years at comparable levels in fields including defence, industry, construction, fashion, finance, banking, FMCG, property, publishing, healthcare, travel, policing, crown office, local and central government.

Recent organisational design roles include launching Enterprise User Experience in Accenture and setting up Wipro Digital.

He has a wide experience in management consultancy and digital technology including business management, strategy, innovation, marketing, advertising, governance, change management, project management, definition, design and delivery. He has been honoured by the British Computer Society for his eminence in IT leadership over the last 15 years with a Fellowship.

He mainly focuses on customer experience engagement and management in both B2B and B2C sectors but is also an inventor involved in creating new human-computer ecosystems. He works with directors and stakeholders whose main focus is increasing efficiency, transaction frequency and accuracy through the provision of knowledge driven, context focused, human-centered and responsive, future proofed (IoT, Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence), progressive interactive organisational change, innovative business processes and technology systems.

“the difference between an engaged customer and an enraged customer is their experience, which customers would you prefer to have?”

“as a customer experience expert, I have no opinion, I wait and get the opinion of the customer as they are the subject matter experts and combine it with business strategy and acumen”

He is involved in defining new business concepts, strategies, requirements, governance (ISO/IEC 38500) and solutions that support businesses and organisation’s involved in transforming themselves to be adaptive and future proof themselves for market disruption.

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#Open #Networking #Ecosystem #Protocol #Patent

While everyone else has been focused on selling the dream of ubiquity Paradigm Interactions Inc. has been working on a protocol to make it a reality. In essence the protocol is about;

A method of defining an organic or inorganic items right to access local networks, be found, used and to record its lifecycle to a distributed linear data system.

The talk below discusses the bases of a US Patent for an Open Networking Ecosystem Protocol conceived by Karl Smith and patented by Paradigm Interactions in 2016.

It’s really important to understand the #KingsNewClothes of Technology the #IoT.

Scenario 1 – Situational Awareness Shopping IoT3 UbiNET

A description of what the IoT will be when it exists by Karl Smith part of the IoT Design Principals talk with Thom Heslop and Karen Smith. Effectively this is an #IoT of all #IoA secured with #blockchain through an information schema and business ecosystem defined by Karl Smith.

An audio version of the talk is here;

In the first instance we will be using it for a retail platform after that an insurance platform is planned ultimately this system can pervade all of society.

 

 

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20 questions about the life and experience of #KarlSmith

I was recently asked to answer 20 questions by Beament Leslie Thomas (BLT) a leading niche, specialist recruitment company http://bit.ly/2grPYUw some of it explains why I like to do the impossible and how.

This edition of 20 Questions is with Karl Smith; CEO of Paradigm Interactions and an acknowledged leader in the field of Human-Centered Design, User Experience and Usability. He has been honored with a Fellowship by the British Computer Society. He is also the Founder of several organizations including UCD UK Conferences and the Human Centered Design Society.

Karl Smith

What was your first job?

My first paid job was working in Sweeties while still at secondary school, measuring out the quarters and yes I was allowed to eat the sweets just not open anything boxed.

Who’s influenced your career most (and why)?

Leonardo da Vinci, because he was never satisfied with being one thing but wanted to discover the world around him and try and understand it. I think our business world is at last understanding that a wide experience is highly valuable, the T shaped person being the current terminology. For me Leonardo da Vinci did not just have a diverse experiences he could link them together to get a 360-degree view from any single starting point. A fascinating person in politics, science, invention, design, art, I wonder who he would invite to a party?

What’s the best piece of advice you could give someone?

Whatever people say it made sense in their head to them before they said it. If you can work out why before you respond you’ll have insights and abilities beyond your age or experience.

What’s the best/worst quality in a leader?

Fearless leaders are the best to work for. They understand what’s going on and why, they establish teams and are inclusive even when it’s not required. The worst kinds of leaders are those without any backbone. Leadership is not a title it’s a behaviour and true leadership is born from responding to and overcoming adversity, leading from the front and inspiring the troops to be better than they thought they could be.

What was the worst piece of advice you’ve been given?

“Don’t be concerned, it will all get resolved during the project”. It never is. Usually this is because the person setting up the project does not have a clear idea of how to achieve the outcomes required – if they are known – and does not understand business pragmatism.

What was your best meeting ever (and why)?

It was not a huge project but I gathered the requirements for The Roundhouse Trusts web presence over a 12-hour period. It was the presentation of the solution to them, there were a couple of other people from the consultancy side, the client agreed and signed off the solution during the meeting. It was one of the few occasions where there was no back and forth about minor details. The reason was I had accepted them as experts in their business and delivered a solution that met all the stakeholder requirements, without one ounce of personal preference, just commercial acumen. I synthesised their needs and dreams into an actionable solution and replayed the solution in their own words back to them.

For the people who have so kindly asked, what was your worst meeting ever (and why)?

I was brought into a new role and was engaged on a huge project with a USA Banking client, the project had been ongoing for over a year. There were red flags everywhere and quite rightly the client was furious about the problems with their new software.

My boss asked me to attend a meeting with client representative to explain the situation and describe what I was doing to rectify it. Fair enough, my response was to say okay, but that I would investigate the problems first and report back to him before attending the meeting.

What I discovered was that the US Bank had used a well respected digital design agency that I will call Bicycle 4, for the sake of context to create a design a solution. This solution had been discarded by the sales team as they did not want to use it. They then brought in some experienced technical people to gather requirements and got rid of them all in order to increase the value margin on the project replacing them with recent graduates. The sales team were not aware that the US bank intended to have Bicycle 4 managed the QA and sign off process. I relayed my report that the reason for the thousands of errors on the project was based on junior people building a system totally unrelated to what had been instructed. I said I was happy to let the US Bank know this was the reason, but he decided there was no need for me to attend the meeting.

And to the meeting, well I was never invited, but I suspect I did rather badly in it.

What did you want to be as a child?

Happy. I was not career focused and I am inquisitive, willing to learn new perspectives and evolve my thinking. This is somewhat at odds with what I do in Management Consulting but thankfully I have augmented standard processes with the Human Centred Design framework of ISO 13407:1999 and ISO 9241-210 which are building blocks towards delivering exceptionally engaging experiences for everyone.

If you weren’t in your current role, what would you be doing?

I write a lot and am working on a couple of books, but if it was a profession I’d be a Barrister or a Judge; the Law is highly fluid and fascinates me. Legal matters are mainly procedural by building case law and arguments to achieve a decision in favour of your clients through advocacy. I did once apply to be a Justice of the Peace because I can keep an open mind.

Tell us about a turning point in your career?

There have been lots but I think the most profound happened at college; I was friends with a large group of Americans studying in London. All apart from two of them died on Pan Am flight 103 at Lockerbie. Of the two survivors, one was my best man when I married and we remain friends today. The experience crystallised a view of the world I still purvey today, “We have one chance to get it right, be the best you can and don’t intentionally limit or use others”

What was your worst mistake (and what did you learn)?

I worked for an insurance company on a change project. The mistake was not forcing my client to adhere to the agreed process of giving me a meeting agenda for every stakeholder meeting. If I had got this I would not have had a meeting with someone already angry that the project was being done without their approval, I would have organised the meeting differently. What I learned was to stick to the planned process as it provides checks, balances and risk management in unexpected and valuable ways.

What’s your favourite holiday destination?

Florida, I’ve been to many places around the world and 20 US states too, but Florida is both industrious and relaxed, the place makes a lot of sense to me.

What are you passionate about?

Delivering to a client’s needs not just responding to their request. It’s what people say about my consultancy; I really do consult not just carry out orders. I’m there to facilitate change and that will mean I discover opportunities and risks others miss. I expand the vision for my clients often without substantive costs because they usually already have the capability but just don’t know how to tap into their own people.

Who’s your business or personal hero/heroine?

My Father, he’s the best man I know. He always worked to give his children opportunity often setting aside personal ambition for us. There is no greater love than to lay down your life for another person. He was also the Queen’s optician, he met Louis Mountbatten and provided optical services to both film and TV stars like Sir Cliff Richard and Kenneth Williams.

What’s your favourite quote or motto?

“Around here we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious…and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” – Walt Disney

What’s your greatest business achievement?

To still be going and loving what I do, I think this is because it’s not just about being paid, I do this work because it makes people’s lives better.

What’s your greatest personal achievement?

Completing the 2001 NYC Marathon bypassing the mass hysteria about Anthrax and travel at the time

What’s your favourite gadget?

My phone, sad I know but it’s true.

What would you choose as your last meal?

What’s your all-time favourite book (and why)?

Phule’s Company. It’s a mix of all the best things – military comedy, social change and advancement based on one simple thing; people are not what they appear to be they are a great deal more complex and amazing than you can see from the surface.

Which one person, dead or alive, would you like to have dinner with?

Leonardo da Vinci, I’d just love to hear him talk or Louis Mountbatten for the same reason.

 

Karl Smith has business experience spanning 27 years at comparable levels in fields including defence, industry, construction, fashion, finance, banking, FMCG, property, publishing, healthcare, travel, policing, crown office, local and central government. Recent organisational design roles include launching Enterprise User Experience in Accenture and setting up Wipro Digital.

He has a wide experience in management consultancy and digital technology and has been honoured by the British Computer Society for his eminence in IT leadership over the last 15 years with a Fellowship.

He mainly focuses on customer experience engagement and management in both B2B and B2C sectors.  Karl is involved in defining new business concepts, strategies, requirements, governance (ISO/IEC 38500) and solutions that support businesses and organisation’s involved in transforming themselves to be adaptive and future proof themselves for market disruption. He has been working on commercial IoT since 2001 and hope technology will soon catch up with his vision.

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#Alive and Present #Everywhere open #IoT3 Ecosystems #SmartLiving

Introduction

The IoT is a much marketed term as the future of all things;

the IoT is interconnected landscape of life experiences and transactions

What is the IoT, how is it intended to work and how does that relate to how it currently works. What are the real business opportunities and how will they be measured as a success? How can your business gain an advantage or benefit? Finally, are there any risks associated with the IoT, either foreseen or not and how might they be mitigated?

What is the IoT and where does it come from?

The IoT is problematic as a description for Ubiquity a concept that has been around for a long time.

Ubiquity is a synonym for omnipresence, the property of being present everywhere

Defence Ubiquity

The technology that underpins ubiquity comes from defence, specifically battlefield command and control (CnC) and has been evolving since the second world war. At that time, it was essential to coordinate and protect allied forces during the war. This strategic view of the battlefield as it changed was provided first through telephone communications (easily intercepted), radio communications (also easily intercepted) and then later RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging).

The second part of the technology that underpins ubiquity is security, the interception of communications in the second world war made it essential to provide proof of authenticity and to encode or encrypt important messages. While this was a common practice off the battlefield by people with the time to do this, the speed of change and the danger on the battlefield made this impossible, although the USA did use native american indian code talkers this security was not embedded across all battlefields as it had also been used in the World War I but German anthropologists had attempted to learn the languages.

Post the second world war, beacon technology (encrypted identifiers) with satellite uplinks provided oversight on large assets. However, until beacons could be miniaturised while maintaining a secure satellite uplink true battlefield ubiquity could not exist. This problem was overcome during the 1990’s enabling complex CnC of navy task groups, air forces, missiles, ground force vehicles and individual soldiers. The defence industry now has access to a fully ubiquitous battlefield command and control system, however it is still controlled by human choice based upon interpretation of sometimes confusing data. This interpretation and ownership of Meaning still resides with human control.

What is the IoT now and what will it become?

Commercial Ubiquity

The IoT is a stepping stone to Ubiquity. The commercialisation of ubiquity has been going on for a long time. It has included white goods requesting a service without customer involvement to fridges asking for milk, cars contacting the garage and customers monitoring their devices remotely.

However, it is yet to deliver the promise of true ubiquitous ecosystems talking to each other and creating a ubiquitous living environment by augmenting human existence, through simplification and service revolution.

Ubiquity is a network of negotiated connections, contracts with policies and attributes that are always present and open

In ubiquity the CIO once again comes to the forefront of the information exchange, management and security around products, services and things as they don’t require marketing to acquire each other’s benefits.

In open IoT Ecosystems there is an emergent human cognition language

This is devoid of the current marketing paradigm of using images to entice rather

Open IoT Ecosystems focus people on avatars in a new and more disruptive way

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#Situational #awareness drives open #IoT #Ecosystems not #visual #interfaces

The foundation for this thinking goes back to a notion of the ‘social life of things’. If things themselves exist and have a number of trajectories and states then those things also potentially have accessible and useful human touch points in the IoT.

Much of the interactions we humans have become used to are in fact simple touch-points to hidden and complex interactions within dispersed and non-interlinked (at the core) technology systems. This simplification process of creating a directed visual presentation layer enables us to maintain a simplified mental model around our interactions. However in IoT technologies the additional integration of voice, touch and thought require a full understanding of the primary cognitive models for each IoT device and an associated and integrated cognitive model, possible clashes or drop outs and load descriptions (for each constantly changing eco-system) by Thing and Cognitive Group. Only then can an interface be defined.

Situational networks with IoT devices services and humans

Situational networks with IoT devices services and humans

Above is a visual description of a set of Things available with a person walking through them projecting themselves, a simple human journey. However working in a local model gets the notion of Things and Cognitive Groups across. Each colour group represents a Thing, attempting to get our attention, each Thing does something different, a different set of interactions, activities, behaviours and outcomes. They can talk to each other or ignore each other. The person traversing the real world and IoT ecosystem walks through several fields of interaction, each time they enter a new field it communicates to them, availability, interaction, messaging (branding, cries for attention, warnings etc.). The first position P1 three touch-points seek engagement, by P2 it’s six touch-points, in P3 five touch-points seeking engagement.

There is no requirement for visual interfaces, in fact audio, smell or touch (vibration or texture) are more likely and in fact desirable to create the ambience for localised interaction and mental association.

Further the current cognitive models associated with the digital existence of tangibles may need to be reconsidered in the context of the IoT as it amalgamates previously separate constructs. It could simply be that the detailed component view we have constructed around daily interactions is no longer valid and we can simplify not only our interactive behaviour but also our descriptors by moving them to high level (directional and instructional avatar) understood constructs rather than the detailed process models we tend to use to live.

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#IoT #Products for the IoT #Economy, its all about #Productization

It should be clear by now to observers of how businesses who are being successful are changing. For them IoT is not just another name for Technology or a Delivery Channel but it is a Pervasive Customer Engagement Productization.

As Technologies come and go, Customers are eternal

What is an IoT Product?

An IoT Product is not the envelope, like a website, app or another container, but the thing that is purchased, transferred or acquired. An IoT Product is pervasive (accessible anywhere on any device, platform and mental model) and modular, designed to be portable, while maintaining all the associated complex information, languages and cultural context, findability, regulatory compliance and trace route for quality, feedback and development.

A IoT Product is the virtualisation of DATA that describes the product uniquely (SELF), its history (LIFE) and ecosystem contracts and policies (USAGE)

Where does an IoT Product live?

An IoT Product comes from an IoT Product Ecosystem that has both directly related bolt-on and ancillary upgrades and other domain related tangible and intangible Products and Services.

How do Businesses get IoT Products?

IoT Products are created by responding to clear signals from people in the market.

IoT Products don’t invent themselves

Creating IoT Products in unqualified hands means someone tells you an idea, you pay for it, they walk away and then you change the KPI’s because the idea you bought has no foundations and does not deliver to your business goals and objectives.

IoT Products always have a value model, ROI model a planned life and death built in

Though not always evident when first launched to the customers an IoT Product will have planned financial or gain attributes. They will be easily acquired by their intended customers and be desirable by others.

IoT products are often found through Big Data projects in a data exchange between different business seeking to extend the value of their current data. These Big Data projects drive huge profits not relative to start-up costs but gained by market capture.

Who creates IoT Products?

There are two aspects of creating an IoT Product, the Product Ecosystem and the IoT Product, which are combined in IoT Productization.

I usually just provide information, but this time, if your looking for IoT Productization please contact me or this skill.

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5 User Experience (Customer Journey) lies, damn lies and absolute myths

1. Anyone can do user experience, nope!

I meet a lot of people claiming to do user experience, process and deliverables aside, they don’t have a usability background so they cannot do user experience.

User experience is a solution capability based upon usability principles and research findings not design aspirations

User experience is a solution capability (not all usability people can do user experience) based upon the experience of conducting usability testing and user research. Usability testing and user research provides the standards and experience of the user that is needed to understand their perspective, elicit the correct (there are wrong ones) requirements in workshops or testing and represent them in projects.

I met (in 2006) a UX expert, I’m always worried when I meet UX experts, because I am a UX expert. Anyway she was moving from Razorfish into the freelance world for the big bucks and working a large project for Honda cars through a digital agency. Unfortunately she did not know how to use any software apart from word, so I checked her out sure enough she was a PA at Razorfish not a UX architect as claimed.

This happens so often it’s shocking, my favourite one has to be the PHd student I met working as an accessibility consultant repackaging W3C guidelines as work for several agencies. What I love about this guy is he does public speaking and has even done UX London and people wonder why I’m not interested in these conferences!

There are loads more fakes some of them milking huge daily rates from major companies, as these companies don’t do any checking it’s their own fault, but it makes me quite sad that clients and employment agencies can’t tell the quality from the junk.

Not only is the user experience world full of fakes, I’d go as far to say that of the people I’ve met in the last 13 years involved in UX;

80% (8 in 10) of UX people are fakes and have no idea what they are doing

These fakes can certainly sell themselves and get work (now in some very senior positions) because the clients did not then and still don’t know what they should be getting out of a user experience professional.

2. User experience can be learned from reading books, nope!

Absolutely read books, but read lots of them, but don’t quote them like the Bible that’s a bit odd. But reading about someone else’s experience does not mean you have any or in fact really understand the context or scope of those experiences.

Do some testing and research, I’m seeing a great deal of roles advertised for UX researcher or UX workshopping this is a great concern as the priority of discovered requirements and their interrelation is almost impossible to communicate in written documents. This critical project information should always be available.

Separating UX research from the UX solution activity may make sense for IT activity but for User Experience Professionals it does not

I assume this was a bright idea of someone who doesn’t actually know anything about UX regardless of their job title.

3. User experience is an IT activity, nope!

User Experience is not an IT process, it starts in the business area before IT is involved

I know a lot of company IT departments have tried to subsume User Experience into their IT process; user experience is considerably less effective this way.

User Experience leads the projects speaking for the End User Stakeholders (customers) as the Business Stakeholders speak for the Business

User Experience fits better into Agile DevOps, Change Management, Operations or as separate Standards Authority within organizations.

4. User experience is a design activity, nope!

Not exactly no, it sets the project brief and requirements then latterly gets involved in research first before creating solution concepts, user testing concepts then defining the final solution.

If there is no research, user experience solutions are not possible

5. The cost of user experience is going down, nope!

Perhaps a better understanding is that the market is flooded with willing bodies, the quality goes down and so does the price because people find it difficult to sell invisible clothing (the kings new cloths) even to people who like the colour and the cut, so accept a reduced price.

So the value of the job title is going down.

User experience should provide major cost benefits and advancements to companies who wish to stand out from the crowd, provided they find people who know how to do UX correctly.

This is the same problem that Agile is going through, people have picked up the language and use one or two of the activities incorrectly but don’t exceed the current status quo because they don’t know how to.

Great Agile is fast and accurate, flexible and delivers usable software and change, just as Great User Experience should provide the experience that customers want and allow them to interact with the client, accurately and often.

Great User Experience delivers increased transactions, interactions and communications towards relationship building.

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#Project #Charlemagne #UIoT, the #unification of the #IoT

Paradigm Interactions has decided to get involved in building products to service the IoT marketplace.

Project Charlemagne is a unification project that links existing technologies with a high-level strategy and vision for financial benefits for those who implement it and gain insights from it.

Project Charlemagne is using Ethereum smart contracts to establish uniquely identifiable items in an IoT network effectively establishing a secondary handshake protocol for network access, that manages policies and identities, this will also allow us to simplify the data that IoT objects require and use ambient power tagging. Some of the sensor technologies do not exist in the format we require yet and we are engaged with medical sensor companies to develop ones that will work with our system.

“Our first product is an IoT retail platform intended to support the mapping of the birth to death (and everything in between) journey of retail products.” says CEO Karl Smith.

While this first version is not as polished as the offerings of major consultancies it does have proprietary information schema, data architecture and ambient power sensor systems that enable IoT item tracking from birth to recycling.

“The opportunities are endless with item level IoT, our whole world becomes a data source, we can deal with anti-social behaviour on an item level, waste and recycling and finally connect product makers to their end customers.” says CEO Karl Smith.

While Paradigm Interactions has already fixed a number of critical problems in regard of enterprise architecture, ontologies and micrometa, component technology working on ambient power requires additional investment to convert real-world interactions into digital insights.

This project remains in development until we can establish a true testbed in a single domain within FMCG.

Until the IoT retail platform is complete Paradigm Interactions focus will remain on client enablement though its IoT Products service.

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#Cognition #Clash in the #IoT #SXSW

Thank you to everyone who attended our (Karl Smith and Thom Heslop) talk at SXSW, it’s the start of a long road into a really complex and contextual problem. But being silent in the crowd as the King walks by with no clothes on is not an option, peoples lives, futures and prosperity is at risk, not to mention the risk of multi-trillion dollar lawsuits that can follow by knowingly distracting people who are engaged in critical tasks.

Cognition Clash in the IoT at SXSW16
Cognition Clash in the IoT at SXSW16

The IoT – Internet of Things (Ubiquity) is the next great opportunity for commerce to engage with business enterprises and customers. However, there is no unified approach to the mental load between physical interaction, mental interaction and digital interaction. This cognitive landscape is inhabited by associated experiences that gel human behaviour and machine interfaces through, touch, mouse and keyboard. The usage of sight, voice and thought create new complexities and risks which have until recently been the subject of defence technologies (battlefield and strategic), where clear outcomes and prescribed mental models exist.

IoT clash girl dies
IoT clash girl dies

The diversification of these touch points and multi-point human logic models clash and derail human thinking patterns.

We are looking for people and their knowledge to help create an Ubiquity Open Standard. We are doing this because no one else has noticed this fundamental error in thinking, the hoping that product based companies will work together in creating common standards that are driven by an understanding of human thinking capabilities, cognitive models, relational thinking and machine interactions is unlikely.

While product manufactures continue with supremacy attitude to other ecosystem products and services,

“the human voice and our needs and desires are subjugated to simply another component”

albeit the one that is constantly paying for everything without any input on how it works.

Some Foundations (the rest will go in a technical paper)

Distributed Cognition studies the ways that memories, facts, or knowledge is embedded in the objects, individuals, and tools in our environment. According to Zhang & Norman (1994), the distributed cognition approach has three key components: Embodiment of information that is embedded in representations of interaction Coordination of enaction among embodied agents. Ecological contributions to a cognitive ecosystem.

In Embodied Interaction Dourish -everyday human interaction is embodied; non-rationalising, intersubjective and bodily active.  User, not designers, create and communicate meaning and manage coupling. Not just concerned with what people do, but also with what they mean by what they do and how that is meaningful to them. It reflects the sets of meanings that can be ascribed to objects and actions over those objects as part of a larger task or enterprise

Cognition the key to the mind, how people understand what they can do is by comparison a Diagnostic Methodology (goals, adaptations, conventions) with what they already know by accessing the Active Narrative patterns they have created in their own minds according to Smith (2005).

Cognition Patterns Cognition Clash in the IoT different people think differently
Cognition Patterns Cognition Clash in the IoT different people think differently

Cognition Groups create a communication paradigm, they carry intention, meaning, risks and benefits.

  • Some Cognition patterns are common, shopping basket etc.
  • Some Cognition Patterns are social by Family, Sports Team etc.
  • Some Cognition Patterns change without notice

Guided Interaction, existing websites offer guided interaction – simplified cognitive pattern encapsulating a plethora of interacting technology and data systems: Shopping Basket – This representation allows for distributed cognition > appropriation > cognitive pattern forming understand– once a user has used a shopping basket they will understand how to use them and generalize: transferable cognitive pattern

Some of the issues with the IoT

  • There is no standard of interactivity for humans in the IoT – not a problem if passive background machine-to-machine. A very big problem if actively interacting with humans, who are all different and can create their own meanings for example LOL.
  • How does a user form any cognitive patterns from an invisible system?
  • IoT combines known patterns as hidden machine-to-machine communications that can create mistrust and security fears
  • Detailed component view we have constructed around daily interactions is no longer valid

Some of our initial research

IoT Design Principals

  • What is device / service for?
  • Where will it be situated?
  • When will it be triggered?
  • What other devices will it be interacting with?
  • Where can it clash?
  • Security? – * Lack of security – Shodan
  • Design Principal: “Do No Harm

IoT Design Risks

Context is critical

  • Situational interaction problems for consideration

The following barriers reduce our ability to understand the situation

  • Perception based on faulty information processing
  • Excessive motivation – over motivated to the exclusion of context
  • Complacency
  • Overload
  • Fatigue
  • Poor communications

A possible solution

  • Avatar (can be visual, sound, texture, smell, taste or a combination) – smart use of Artificial intelligence (AI), where the users cognitive interface is patterned on their unique cognition pattern through a learning algorithm
  • This avatar should be directional and instructional like digital signage
  • This avatar should respond to the users behavioural interaction and should fall away gracefully as users behaviour becomes more ‘expert* In effect it should be a learning system – learns from the users rather than based on static rules
  • For example the AI that George Hotz has built into his self driving car while not the answer points to the kind of thinking required to find the answer, don’t tell the machine to watch and learn from a human and then carry out your task (from 3.33 to 5.04) “the point is to drive naturally like a human, not some engineer’s idea of safety“. For anyone who then thinks this is the final solution, please let us know why you think driving a car is like cooking dinner or navigating the street?

The Full SXSW Talk is on YouTube

Connect to the speakers on LinkedIn here Karl Smith and Thom Heslop

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#Cognition #Clash in The #Internet of #Things

I’m speaking at SXSW Interactive 2016 on Cognition Clash in The Internet of Things, if your in Austin, TX let me know?

The IoT is the next great opportunity for business enterprises to engage with customers. However there is no unified approach to the mental load between context of use, physical interaction, mental interaction and digital interaction. This cognitive landscape is inhabited by associated experiences that gel human behavior and machine interfaces through, touch, mouse and keyboard. The usage of sight, voice and thought create new complexities and risks which have until recently been the subject of defense technologies, where clear outcomes and prescribed mental models exist. The diversification of these touch points and multi-point human logic models clash and derail human thinking patterns.

http://schedule.sxsw.com/2016/events/event_PP47495

Hashtags: #sxsw #IoTdesign

Sunday, March 13
12:30PM – 1:30PM

JW Marriott 
Salon FGH
110 E 2nd St

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#Customer #desire leads #disruptive #innovation

A great deal of effort is being spent on customer experience and user experience that misses the point, experience is about desire, not process or fulfilment.

Desire drives behaviour

Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) proposed the concept of psychological hedonism, which asserts that the “fundamental motivation of all human action is the desire for pleasure”. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1588–1679) claimed that “self-consciousness is desire.” Psychologists often describe desires as different from emotions as they are mechanical and a response to chemical imbalance or lack, such as the stomach which needs food, the body needs oxygen, as opposed to, emotions that arise from a person’s mental state. There is a huge study in this area but that not the focus here, if we can agree that desire is a key driver in behaviour how is customer experience and user experience meeting this central requirement? The image above is one key to desire but not the only one.

Reactive behaviour

In accepting the above we open the digital realm to a fundamental understanding that changes the paradigm from understood and herded users into a much wilder and complex behavioural model that explains why user experience and customer consultancy is not scaleable or easily globalised.

Desire affects the digital business paradigm

The constant attrition and expense of the current digital model is hugely frustrating for business, if they buy plant equipment there is a defined cost, depreciation, training model and risk factors, in digital much of what they are sold is hopeful. Key performance indicators are fudged and often refined later (as unattainable) however if desire is considered the starting point and an opportunity this disruptor can change the outcome and all the project outputs.

Understanding desire for disruptive innovation

Many of the current bunch of disruptive innovations are technology lead, where people have attributed their desires to the capabilities and experiences provided. This works with cutting edge or refocused technologies, how does it work with travel, banking, food shopping? Engaging customers in desire based research with a sub focus on a concept like banking as a counterpoint enables the target audience to create the disruption rather than be disaffected they become the leaders of product revolutions.

Delivering disruptive innovation in a consultancy

UCD Innovation Process Invested by Karl Smith in 2001, updated in 2003, 2008 Copyright 2001 Karl Smith
UCD Innovation Process Invested by Karl Smith in 2001, updated in 2003, 2008 Copyright 2001 Karl Smith

The exact method of delivering disruptive innovation is proprietary to Karl Smith.

 

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Welcome to my blog

About Karl Smith

Karl Smith works globally with directors, stakeholders and customers of multi-national enterprises across all verticals and technology stacks whose focus is on new concepts and capabilities that drive customer engagement, interaction and retention.

He creates digital companies, strategies and services that drive customer centricity into the core of client companies, that in turn enable them to realise their ambitions to engage with and establish a consistent two-way communication and interaction with their customers.

These new companies and capabilities are underwritten with tailored blue sky work, digital strategy, management consulting and program planning fitting to tight timescales, strategically correct, fully featured, useable, governable, scalable, efficient, end to end business propositions, service designs, applications, integrations and software systems.

Karl Smith Practical Skills

He is a highly competent, personable, creative and motivated person with a keen insight and definition ability. He is a critical thinker and able to rapidly discover the essence of problems then define, communicate, create buy-in and deliver end to end digital and process solutions. He positively motivates those around him and is able to engender a great team dynamic by leading from the front. He has business experience since 1989 at comparable levels in fields including defence, industry, energy, pharmaceutical, biomedical, construction, fashion, finance, banking, FMCG, property, publishing, healthcare, travel, policing, crown office, local and central government. He has specialist banking experience with investment, private, commercial, business, trading, wealth management in Europe, USA, China, Australia, Japan and Russia.

Karl Smith is a Founder and Director of UCD UK Conferences.

Karl has worked with several companies to define for launch or redefine their service offerings, business structures or digital presence including;

  • Avaloq AG – Setting up enterprise wide adoption of design thinking principals, master plan delivered in just two months.
  • Wipro Digital – Launch Wipro Digital, Design Thinking, Service Design, Creative Technology Services, User Experience Strategy, Creative Design Services, M&A Designit – 2014
  • Accenture – Launch of Enterprise User Experience, Digital Services Launch, M&A Fjord – 2012
  • Pearson Publishing – Digital Services Restructuring – 2011
  • Deutsche Bank – Self Service Paradigm Shift – 2011
  • RBS – Risk Management – 2010
  • The Oxford University Press – Mobile First Digital Strategy – 2009

Karl Smith has a wide experience in management consultancy and digital technology including business management, start-up, business strategy, digital strategy, advertising, customer experience, user experience, productisation, governance, change management, project management (waterfall & Agile), enterprise architecture and project definition, design, optimisation, delivery and digital marketing. He has been honoured by the British Computer Society for his eminence and significant contribution to the fields of UCD and User Experience with a Fellowship.

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12 #UX things you need to know

Getting into user experience, what you need to know?

What will a person need to be able to do to get into user experience;

1. Can you think?

Not the most subtle way to ask, but can you be creative? Thinking at the beginning of a project can save a huge amount of money and time later, but many user experience people blast their way into a project by starting on wireframes, without knowing what they are doing.

A huge amount of user experience simply is not user experience, its pretty pictures with poor justifications ‘it’s best practice’ my usual response is ‘prove that it’s best practice’.

2. Can you find things out?

Do you have a critical mind, can you work out what is missing from the information you have been given.

A project requires a bit of detective work because there are always gaps in the information provided to user experience, mainly because clients and IT don’t know what to provide or what is provided has had the juicy bits (outlier views) removed because clients and IT don’t know they are important.

3. Are you objective?

Having a strong opinion on user experience is really important, but it must always be tempered with an open non judgemental attitude. Are you willing to be changed by what your client, users or IT people know?

User experience people are not the gate keepers of an absolute set of rules, we have two ears and one mouth, we should listen twice as much as we speak.

4. Can you discern Fact from Fiction?

Again talking with clients, users or IT people can be pretty confusing unless you can work out if what they are talking about is still within the boundaries and various time lines of the project. A quick guide;

  • Clients tend to talk about the desired end state
  • Users tend to talk about any snippets they have heard about the project or their hopes for it
  • IT tends to take the pragmatic approach by thinking ‘what can we really deliver’

They are all true or were true at some point, or may be true if we had more time and money etc.

5. Can you deal with the politics?

Can you avoid taking sides in the various feuds that were going on before you got there and not flame the fires of distrust between business and IT.

6. Will you understand the business you are serving?

Your in a service relationship with the business, helping them get past their assumptions about their users and giving them some facts to act upon.

7. Will you understand the users you are serving?

Your in a service relationship with the users, helping them get what they need and desire.

8. Can you test – concepts, theories, business thinking, user perceptions etc?

Your going to need a lot of guts to question other peoples thinking.

User experience people reserve the right to ask stupid questions, in order to avoid doing stupid things, by Karl Smith 1999.

I’ve been saying this since 1999, I say it on every project.

9. Can you seek validation?

The user experience person is not right, they can come up with concepts and questions but a user experience person never decides they are right, they must check out what they do with other people. Often this process of seeking validation reveals more information and opens door to previously inaccessible people.

10. Can you communicate – findings and concepts?

Can you talk to people and provide information to them in a digestible way? The best way to work is to not use jargon, not assume that people understand anything especially verbal references to famous people or design principals.

You need to be able to package your information in the users and stakeholders own verbal environment, so that they recognise and understand it when they hear it.

11. Can you understand and benefit from the project teams expertise?

Do you know what other people on the project do? For example do you know enough about technology to carry out research with developers to pre-scope extra user requirements.

Can you cope with the give and take that happens during development and know which things to fight for?

12. Finally do you keep your common sense active?

Can you spot a non sensible request, a great example of this was NASA spending $1,000,000 on a pen that would work in space, while Roscosmos (USSR) gave their astronauts a pencil. Can you give a reasoned non personalised argument for not doing something?

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#Context matters in #Usability

Context matters in usability

While any kind of user testing is better than none, usability testing out of context is like testing a car on water, it gives some basic information and not a lot more. If performance and use are important at all, then testing should take place in an environment standard to the expected users.

Contextual Usability

In practice this means testing children’s games at their homes, schools or clubs. Testing e-commerce websites at work, on mobile phones, PDA’s (on the bus, train, plane), internet cafes and in the home. Testing software in call centres, oil rigs, supermarkets, small shops, banks anywhere that they are designed to be used.

Can anyone honestly say that their environment does not affect what they do and how they do it. An extreme example would be fx traders using complex software, telephones and chatting to their colleagues while working within a constant stream of information that changes their activities, focus and effectiveness. Not only does context define how long things are used but it restricts attention span, acceptance of navigation and take-up.

Intelligent business requires a full understanding the effectiveness of new products and services. By testing in context, clients can get realistic data on the performance of systems. Such data can be valuable to making decisions on changes, or having confidence that the benefits you expect will be realised in practice. By testing real users in context potential problems can be eliminated and new previously unconsidered opportunities developed.

Republished from article of August 07, 2006

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