#UI is not #UX

There seems to be a huge level of confusion around user experience (UX), but one of the key things is that the user interface is not the user experience architecture.

  1. User Interface – what the user sees
  2. Interface Logic – what the user can do
    • Logical connections
    • Interactive behaviours
    • Content/data calls
    • Content/data inputs
  3. Data Systems – the content the user creates and interacts with
  4. Platform – the users delivery mechanism

Difference between UI and UX

user experience is defined by what users can do, not just what they can see

If you are paying for UX you should be asking “how did the UX change the interaction, logic, data systems and platform” if it did not influence it, you only got UI design.

The user interface is the top level component that users see.

The user experience is not a single component it is a set of features that is facilitated through several components.

An update about paying for UX, as business start to recognise that visual tweaks to a product after the solution stage are not enough for savvy consumers.

 

 

Also the non-system elements – customer service, marketing and POS material (is this consistent with the message being communicated on the system) etc.

The customer, client or worker doesn’t see the difference – they see one big system.

It is often frustrating to do a piece of research and find out all the weak points in an organisations’ “system” and be told, just tell us what the UI needs to do. It is a rare job indeed that they are interested in the other non-system fail-points of the user experience.

 

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Getting #UX done the UX #engagement #process

UX is a highly complex set of research tools and outputs, the use of which is dependant upon time, cost and the clients willingness to accept them.

Question 1, why are you there?

If the client were to think in best practice terms which for them would deliver exactly what they require then everyone would have a great experience of the process. Unfortunately it is pretty much a given that clients want to prove themselves knowledgable about well everything, in control and this is one of the main problems. I often hear clients say “I understand our users” or “I built this company so I know what users want” maybe they did or used to, but the fact they have called in an agency or consultancy means they don’t anymore. What clients mostly mean is I have my agenda and I want you to listen to it and agree with me. That way is the road to mediocrity.

What does the client really want?

It’s worth at this point asking the client what they want out of the process. If they only want a pat on the head and to be told they are great, best to give them that, do the job get paid and don’t put it on your CV.

If the client (really) wants their products or services to have higher impact, increased transactions, market share and gain advantage, then explain what your doing, how they gain and that great ux will fundamentally change how they work.

Question 2, what does your client understand about what your doing there?

UX is not UI, the experience is not only the interface, it’s what you can do with the interface, what tasks can be completed, what data can be inputted, transformed or called into the UI.

The real pitch for real UX.

The pitch to a new client is not we can make your product or service like your competitors it’s “we can make your offering stand out from the crowd”. Great ux is about shouting over the noise and changing the rules, “don’t catch up – great ux creates the opportunity to jump ahead”.

Question 3, how will your client know they have succeeded?

This is not a KPI hunt, clients are not really interested in you proving success, they already have their own success metrics, strategic plans and objectives they need to report up the chain. They may not be able to directly tell you as these things are highly confidential the important thing from an engagement perspective is can you work them out? Then can you articulate these back to the client in ux terms.

The real job of ux, find out about the users.

The real job of ux is to align the business with the users, from the user perspective. Users ask “what’s in it for me”, “what do I personally gain”. This means that user research is required by the clients customers, in order to work out what they want for from the business in order to take up their services or buy their products, how they will want to interact and what they will give the business for a relationship.

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#User #Interface (UI) is not the User #Experience (UX)

There seems to be a huge level of confusion around user experience (UX) but one of the key things is that

User interface UI is not the user experience UX, Karl Smith 2000

Simple digital systems are constructed with several interlinked components;

The User Interface (UI) is not the User Experience (UX)

UI Layer – User Interface – what the user sees

Logic Layer – Interface Logic – what the user can do

    • Logical connections
    • Interactive behaviours
    • Content/data calls
    • Content/data inputs

Data Layer – the content the user creates and interacts with

Platform Layer – the users delivery mechanism

Getting Value from Consulting

If you’re paying for UX you should be asking “how did the UX change the interaction, logic, data systems and platform” if it did not influence it, you only got UI design.

The user interface is the top-level component that users see while user experience architecture is defined by;

UX is what users can do, not just what they can see, Karl Smith 2000

The user experience is not a single component, UX is a set of features that is facilitated through several components

Republished from a post in 2001.

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